The Power of Peer Support

The Power of Peer Support

In addition to therapy, medication and hospitalization this research study on peer support shows that sharing “lived” experience with others is a powerful and highly effective tool in the mental health arsenal.

Guilt vs. Shame

Guilt vs. Shame

People who have Borderline Personality Disorder experience extremely strong emotional reactions. In fact, emotional dysregulation is one of the primary diagnostic descriptions for BPD. Marsha Linehan, PhD, the developer of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), the most prevalent treatment available for people struggling with BPD, believes that among all emotions people with BPD struggle with, shame is the most powerful and difficult to deal with.

KonMari and BPD: Organizing Your Emotions

KonMari and BPD: Organizing Your Emotions

How does KonMari relate to Borderline Personality Disorder? Well, it brought to mind something that is a key element in the BPD treatment Dialectical Behavior Therapy developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan. She calls it Radical Acceptance

Too Much Empathy: Is That a BPD Thing?

Too Much Empathy: Is That a BPD Thing?

Many people who are diagnosed with Borderline Personality who exhibit a high degree of emotional sensitivity along with what is described as a genetic vulnerability to emotional dysregulation might actually possess a form of giftedness. Which begs the question: “If this is a gift, why does it hurt so much?”

Free BPD Video for Awareness Month

Free BPD Video for Awareness Month

Throughout the month we have offered people a free screening online of our 30 minute program “Understanding Borderline Personality Disorder from the 5 part series “If Only We Had Known: A Guide to Borderline Personality Disorder”

How Many People With BPD Recover?

How Many People With BPD Recover?

For many years after borderline personality disorder was first defined in 1938, the conventional wisdom among mental health providers was that BPD was a permanent condition. The poor response by patients to existing psychotherapies and medications created a belief that the disorder was incurable.